Medal of Bravery - Signals Recipients

From RCSigs.ca
Jump to: navigation, search

The Medal of Bravery has been awarded to the following 8 Signals and C&E Branch personnel.[1]

Name Award Era Award Date Citation
MCpl J.D.R. April
3 July 1973
Three young men, MCpl Robert April and Messrs. Terrance William Fagan and Eric Thomas Weir together rescued a mother and three children who were in danger of drowning in the Rideau canal at Ottawa on October 31, 1971. The mishap occurred when a car driven by a woman went out of control, broke through the guardrail along the canal wall and plunged into the water. MCpl April was first on the scene moments after the accident. He jumped into the frigid water where he was joined by the other two men. The car was already sinking as they assisted the victims through the car windows to safety. Had it not been for the prompt and concerted action of the three young men, the incident might well have resulted in a major loss of life.
Sgt J.C. Bromstad
26 June 2014
On June 29, 2012, Sergeant Jason Bromstad, Chief Petty Officer 1st Class Michael Salter and Paul Charbonneau pulled an injured man from a burning vehicle, on Highway 401, near Gananoque, Ontario. As a result of a collision, the fuel tank of the victim's vehicle ruptured and the leaking fuel ignited. In spite of the rapidly spreading flames, the rescuers worked to pry open the door and drag the victim to safety, moments before the truck became fully engulfed.
Capt J.R. Farncombe
5 March 1973
Following the disastrous landslide on May 5, 1971, at St.-Jean-Vianney, Quebec, Capt Wenaas, Capt Farncombe and Cpl Verchère of the Canadian Armed Forces combed the area by helicopter looking for survivors. Much of the search was made in darkness and under hazardous flying conditions. The following morning, Capt Farncombe and his crew located a survivor atop a car, and hovering over the vehicle hoisted the victim to safety. Cpl Verchère disembarked from the helicopter to make a search of houses which were in imminent danger of collapse. In the course of the search operation, the two pilots and Cpl Verchère displayed perseverance and courage in the face of grave risks.
Cpl C.W. Galbraith
13 December 2001
Shortly before dawn on July 4, 2001, Cory Galbraith and Jamin George climbed a 43-metre communication tower to rescue a suicidal fellow soldier at the Canadian Forces Base, in Kingston, Ontario. In total darkness, Cpl Galbraith made his way up to the distraught soldier, lying on a narrow steel beam near the top. After winning the man's confidence, he convinced him to come down but the soldier soon became agitated and attempted to jump. Cpl Galbraith restrained him by pinning him to the tower with his body. He was attempting to calm him down when Pte George arrived to lend a hand. Without the aid of climbing or safety equipment, Cpl Galbraith and Pte George began their dangerous descent with the struggling individual. Twice during this one-hour ordeal, the soldier managed to elude their grasp and climbed back up several metres before they were able to regain control. Although exhausted, Cpl Galbraith and Pte George inched their way down to the ground where others took over.
Pte J.K.R. George
13 December 2001
Shortly before dawn on July 4, 2001, Cory Galbraith and Jamin George climbed a 43-metre communication tower to rescue a suicidal fellow soldier at the Canadian Forces Base, in Kingston, Ontario. In total darkness, Cpl Galbraith made his way up to the distraught soldier, lying on a narrow steel beam near the top. After winning the man's confidence, he convinced him to come down but the soldier soon became agitated and attempted to jump. Cpl Galbraith restrained him by pinning him to the tower with his body. He was attempting to calm him down when Pte George arrived to lend a hand. Without the aid of climbing or safety equipment, Cpl Galbraith and Pte George began their dangerous descent with the struggling individual. Twice during this one-hour ordeal, the soldier managed to elude their grasp and climbed back up several metres before they were able to regain control. Although exhausted, Cpl Galbraith and Pte George inched their way down to the ground where others took over.
Cpl M.D. Hewitt
25 July 1977
Cpl. Marvin Hewitt, of Canadian Forces Base Moose Jaw, entered a water-storage tank on the base to rescue James Ashton who, on 2 June 1976, was overcome by fumes while painting its interior. Mr. Ashton had already tried to free a fellow workman from the tank and had collapsed as his companion was being removed. When Cpl. Hewitt came on the scene, he crawled into the narrow container and persisted until Mr. Ashton was freed. The tank was, however, constructed with a very narrow escape hatch and only tiny holes for air. As a result Cpl. Hewitt was also overcome by the fumes and in turn had to be assisted by others. By their actions Cpl. Hewitt and James Ashton narrowly averted a serious accident.
WO A.M. MacEachern
30 October 2013
On July 13, 2011, while on holiday, Warrant Officer Angel MacEachern rescued a boy who was in danger of drowning at Ingonish Beach, Nova Scotia. Without any rescue equipment available, Warrant Officer MacEachern swam out against the strong current to reach the boy and struggled in the choppy water to bring him safely to the beach.
CPO1 M. Salter
26 June 2014
On June 29, 2012, Sergeant Jason Bromstad, Chief Petty Officer 1st Class Michael Salter and Paul Charbonneau pulled an injured man from a burning vehicle, on Highway 401, near Gananoque, Ontario. As a result of a collision, the fuel tank of the victim's vehicle ruptured and the leaking fuel ignited. In spite of the rapidly spreading flames, the rescuers worked to pry open the door and drag the victim to safety, moments before the truck became fully engulfed.

References

  1. Data compiled from multiple sources including The London Gazette, The Canadian Gazette, Library and Archives Canada, and Semaphore to Satellite