Member of the Order of the British Empire - Signals Recipients

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The Member of the Order of the British Empire has been awarded to the following 64 Signals personnel.[1]

Name Award Era Award Date Citation
Maj P.E. Amyot
WW2
13 September 1945
Maj J.W. Anderson
WW2
12 July 1945
Maj G.C. Baker
WW2
22 September 1945
Maj E.D. Baldock
WW2
14 June 1945
Capt J.G. Becker
WW2
12 July 1945
Maj A.G. Brenneman
WW2
15 December 1945
Maj P.F. Burgoyne
WW2
15 December 1945
Maj A.J. Cahill
WW2
1 February 1945
Maj J.M. Catto, ED
WW2
15 December 1945
Lt R.M. Caza
WW2
30 June 1945
Maj A.M. Clark, ED
WW2
17 March 1945
Capt J.R. Connell, CD
Korea
6 June 1953
Captain Connell has carried out the duties of Signal Officer to 25 Canadian Infantry Brigade since April 1952. He has organized the brigade communications under difficult and unusual conditions of static defence. The fact that there has been no lapse in the communications within the brigade and its supporting arms during his tour of command of the signal troop is due largely to his technical ability and the hard work he has done. He quickly gained experience and at every opportunity has encouraged and advised the Battalion Signal Officers without regard to the inconvenience to himself. At the same time, he has shown an outstanding spirit of cooperation in integrating his troop within the Divisional Signal Regiment, working in the closest harmony with officers and men whose technical methods were frequently different from those to which he was accustomed. He has gone out of his way to offer the benefit of his opinion, technical knowledge and of his resources where they could be of advantage to the division as a whole. His hard work and devotion to duty, and especially his spirit of cooperation which has done so much to make the divisional communications effective, are worthy of special recognition.
Maj M.I. Coombes
WW2
1 January 1946
Capt A.T. Curliss
WW2
15 December 1945
Maj J.H.W. Currie
WW2
1 January 1946
Maj T.P. Davidson
WW2
13 June 1946
Maj G.P. Dewar
WW2
15 December 1945
Lt C.E. Doeringer
WW2
12 July 1945
Maj J.D. Duncan
WW2
30 December 1944
Maj W.H. Finch
WW2
1 February 1945
Maj H.G. Fraser
WW2
15 December 1945
Capt E.G. Fraser
WW2
15 December 1945
Maj S.E. Frederick
WW2
14 June 1945
Maj D.H. George, MC, CD
Korea
2 August 1952
Major George was Officer Commander, 25 Canadian Infantry Brigade Signal Squadron, Royal Canadian Corps of Signals from the mobilization of 25 Canadian Infantry Brigade in August 1950 until November 1951, when he assumed the appointment of Brigade Major. As Officer commanding 25 Canadian Infantry Brigade Signal Squadron, Major George organized and trained the signal squadron so swiftly that the squadron was able to take part in all exercises and provide operations during the early part of the training period. In operations the communications of the Brigade have been outstanding due to his efforts. In fact, the communications of the Brigade have received very favourable comments from both British and United States Army formations. As Brigade Major, Major George has tirelessly carried out that function. He has developed new means of controlling air strikes and performed the staff work during several heavy battles. This officer's endless energy, determination, devotion to duty and intelligence has contributed largely to the successful operation of the Brigade.
Capt R.S. Grant
WW2
15 December 1945
WO2 L. Griffiths
WW2
15 December 1945
WO1 G.A. Griffiths
WW2
12 July 1945
Lt H.B. Henderson
WW2
15 December 1945
Capt W.J. Henderson
WW2
15 December 1945
Capt J.W.P. Johnson
WW2
1 February 1945
Maj H.J. Keating
WW2
8 June 1944
Capt D.S. Larter
WW2
15 December 1945
Maj P.R. Layard
WW2
17 March 1945
Maj J.A.K. Leger
WW2
20 October 1945
Capt F.J.J. McCauley
WW2
1 February 1945
Capt T.C. McGill
WW1
14 January 1920
Siberia: The KING has been graciously pleased to give orders for the following promotion in, and appointments to, the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, for valuable services rendered in connection with military operations in Siberia. Dated 3rd June, 1919
Lt G.P. Mitchell
WW2
1 February 1945
Maj H.O. Moran
WW2
1 January 1943
Capt A.J. Morrall
WW2
1 January 1944
Capt F.E. Moynihan
WW2
2 June 1943
Capt R.G. Murray
WW2
15 December 1945
Maj J.A. Parker
WW2
13 June 1946
Maj C.H. Parks
WW2
1 January 1946
Maj C.A. Peck
WW2
1 February 1945
Maj F.T. Portsmouth
WW2
1 January 1945
WO1 J.C. Potts
WW2
1 January 1946
Maj F.R. Pratten
WW2
15 December 1945
Capt R.F. Riddell
WW2
13 June 1946
Lt H.F. Roche
WW2
15 December 1945
Lt D.V. Roland
WW2
13 September 1945
Maj G.M. Rolfe, DSO
WW2
15 June 1946
Lt J.S. Rolfe
WW2
15 December 1945
During the months of February and march 1945, when all the senior officers in the operating company of 2nd Canadian Corps Signals had either become casualties or had been replaced, Lieutenant Rolfe acted as Senior Signalmaster at main Headquarters 2nd Canadian Corps in addition to his normal duties as commander of an operating section. From 15 February to 13 March 1945, the signal office at main headquarters handled the greatest volume of signal traffic in the history of 2nd Canadian Corps; at one period there were eight divisions, five independent armoured brigades and four army groups Royal Artillery under command, also many smaller units. This large number of formations, together with the heavy flow of signal traffic to two army headquarters and a flanking corps imposed an extremely heavy burden on the signal office organization. The normal complement of personnel at the main signal office was considerably reduced by the formation of a tactical headquarters; nevertheless, during this period where three to four times the normal amount of signal traffic passed through the main signal office, this officer, working under continual heavy pressure, inspired his men by his cheerfulness, patience, and organizing ability, to the end that not a single message was lost or unavoidably delayed. By his initiative and devotion to duty Lieutenant Rolfe set an outstanding example and contributed materially to the successful progress of the operation of this corps.
Capt J.S. Rourke
WW2
13 September 1945
Lt A.L.J. Sirois
WW2
9 June 1945
Maj P.D. Smith
WW2
15 December 1945
Capt J.D. Smythe
WW2
15 December 1945
Maj G.E. Streb
WW2
29 September 1945
Maj H.R. Varcoe
WW2
17 March 1945
Lt M. Veilleux
WW2
23 June 1945
Capt R.A. Wagner
WW2
8 June 1944
Capt W.E. Wheeler, CD
Korea
8 November 1952
Captain Wheeler was Second-in-Command, 25 Canadian Infantry Brigade Signal Squadron from its formation in August 1950 until it was reduced to a Signal Troop in November 1951 and since November 1951 has commanded the troop. When the Special Force Signals were being formed at Kingston, Ontario, Captain Wheeler worked very long hours instructing, planning and carrying out administrative duties concerned with organization and training. His outstanding ability, knowledge of signals and endurance, aided greatly in preparing the units in the time allotted. In Fort Lewis he was responsible for co-ordinating training and, in particular, training operators and regimental signallers. Due to his thoroughness and determination, the training was well conducted and the excellent wireless communications experienced in Korea have been a direct result. When the Commanding Officer proceeded on the Advance Party he completed the administration and move of troops. While Second-in-Command of Signals in Korea, he was responsible to ensure that all communications functioned properly or that proper action was taken to correct faulty communications while the Commanding Officer was away on reconnaissance or liaison. It was with the utmost confidence that the Commanding Officer was able to leave matters in the hands of Captain Wheeler. Since taking over command of 25 Canadian Infantry Brigade Signals, Captain has continued his excellent efforts. The communications have been outstanding to the notice of other United Nations forces in Korea. Captain Wheeler has led and inspired his men under many adverse conditions. During November 1951 when enemy artillery constantly interrupted his line communications, he worked day and night under enemy fire to keep communications working. The good communications experienced have been a direct result of Captain Wheeler's ability and leadership.
Capt B.L. Willis
WW2
1 January 1946
Maj W.H.T. Wilson
WW2
22 September 1945
Maj J.D. Wilson, MC, ED
WW2
2 June 1943

References

  1. Data compiled from multiple sources including The London Gazette, Library and Archives Canada, History of the Royal Canadian Corps of Signals 1903-1961 and Semaphore to Satellite