Distinguished Conduct Medal - Signals Recipients

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The Distinguished Conduct Medal has been awarded to the following 54 Signals personnel. In addition, 2 Signals recipients have also been awarded the first bar.[1]

Name Award Era Award Date Citation
Pte H.M. Adams
WW1
23 June 1915
For conspicuous gallantry from 22nd to 25th April, 1915, when telephone lines were down, in carrying orders under heavy shell and rifle fire to the St. Julien-Ypres salient. [Canadian Signals Company.]
Spr A. Bagrie
WW1
22 October 1917
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty as linesman. In spite of heavy fire he worked continuously throughout the action, repairing the lines with absolute .disregard for his own safety, and was successful in keeping up communication under the most difficult conditions. He showed great fearlessness and devotion to duty.
Sgt C.W. Ball
WW1
12 March 1919
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during operations, near Cambria, 28th. September to 1st October, 1918. He. laid and maintained lines night and day, carrying on at times alone when members of his party were killed and wounded. His whole behaviour was marked by sustained and unselfish devotion to duty, and materially contributed 5o the success of the operations.
Sgt H. Banks
WW1
10 January 1917
For conspicuous gallantry in action. He continually laid and repaired wires under very heavy fire. He set a fine example of coolness and courage throughout.
Sgt F. Barber
WW1
1 January 1917
For conspicuous devotion to duty. He has rendered most valuable 'services in the Brigade Signal Section, and has at all times set a splendid example. [Can. Mtd. Rif.]
Sgt F.H. Bates
WW1
1 January 1917
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He has at all times set a splendid example of courage and initiative, thereby greatly increasing the efficiency of the signal section. [R. Can. Engrs.]
Lt H.M. Bennett
WW1
1 January 1918
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He rendered valuable service in operations, when he, on several occasions, with great courage, personally went over lines under heavy fire, in order to maintain and ensure perfect communication.
Spr J.B. Burnett
WW1
12 March 1919
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during the attack on Drocourt-Queant line, 2nd/3rd September, 1918. He was linesman on forward communication, and although badly shaken up and bruised by a shell, carried on repairing and laying wires under heavy enemy shell and machine-gun fire for seventy-two hours continuously. His work was the best of any man in the section, and his contempt for danger was a splendid example to his comrades. [No. 3 Section, 1st Canadian Divisional Signal Company.]
Cpl E. Casstles
WW1
23 June 1915
For conspicuous gallantry near Ypres from 22nd to 28th April, 1915, in repairing telegraph and telephone lines under heavy shell fire, and maintaining communication. [Canadian Signal Company.]
A/Cpl E.H. Challacombe
WW1
12 March 1919
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty At Haynecourt, on 28th September, 1918, he remained on the lines with another linesman for over three hours under very heavy shell fire, repairing breaks in the lines. In spite of his having to work in an exposed area no line remained out of order for more than a few minutes. [1st Div. Sig. Co., Can. Engrs., attd. 1st Bde., Can. Fd. Arty.]
Sgt C.L. Cooling
WW1
1 January 1918
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty on all occasions. His splendid courage and ability in maintaining artillery communications under heavy fire and most adverse circumstances have been most marked.
Sgt F.J. Corcoran
WW1
1 January 1917
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He has shown great courage and ability in performing his duties as signal superintendent, under very trying conditions.
Gnr J.A. Craig
WW1
28 March 1918
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. Immediately after an attack he started out with a party in order to establish a wireless station. He guided this party, carrying heavy wireless equipment for a long distance under exceptionally heavy shell fire, and successfully established the station. Though the aerial was repeatedly blown away, he maintained communication until relieved two days later. To his courage and untiring efforts were due the extraordinary results that were obtained.
Sgt R.A. Craven
WW1
3 June 1919
From 8th November to 11th November, 1918, during the advance from Quievrechain to Mons he was continuously employed on the construction and maintenance of forward telephone lines. It was chiefly due to his example of gallantry and devotion to duty to his men that communication with the forward troops was maintained. [2nd Div. Sig. Co.]
CSM B.E. Dabson
WW1
3 June 1919
Throughout the Amiens operations of the 8th to the 20th August, 1918, the Drocourt-Queant operation of the 28th August to the 4th September and the Canal du Nord operation of the 27th September to the 6th October, 1918, he was in charge of the despatch rider section. He showed great courage and utter disregard for his own safety. [1st Div. Sig. Co.]
Pte W. Duncan
WW1
23 June 1915
For conspicuous gallantry from 22nd - 25th April, 1915, when telephone lines were down, in carrying orders under heavy shell and line fire, to the St. Julien-Ypres Salient. [Canadian Signal Company.]
Sgt H.J. Faulkner
WW1
15 November 1918
For conspicuous gallantry during an attack. He went forward with one signaller under heavy fire, and kept in touch with lamp station at advanced brigade headquarters until within two hundred yards of the objective. Here the ground was heavily swept by machine-gun fire, and he was only saved by the action of a Tank, which cleared the position. He set a splendid example of enterprise and devotion to duty.
A/Cpl G. Fielding
WW1
1 January 1919
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during the battles of Amiens and Arras, when as N.C.O. in charge of an artillery brigade headquarters signallers, he laid and maintained lines to advanced battery positions and observation posts. His party worked without rest, at times under heavy shell fire, and it was chiefly due to his courage and initiative that the ever-recurring signals for the S.O.S. barrage were communicated without delay. His work for over two years in France has been invaluable. [2nd Can. Div. Sig. Coy., Can. Engrs.]
Cpl J.E. Flanigan
WW1
12 March 1919
During the operations in the battle before Cambrai, from the 26th September to 2nd October, 1918, he was in charge of a group of linesmen laying and maintaining the telephone lines from the brigade report centre to the headquarters of the battalions. Throughout this period he worked incessantly, night and day, laying new lines and repairing breaks, and by his great personal gallantry and able control of his men, maintained this most important part of the brigade's inter-communications. [3rd Div, Sig. Co:, Can. Engrs., attd. 9th Can. Infy. Bde.]
Sgt W. Fullerton
WW1
15 November 1918
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during an attack. He and his party followed the centre battalion, laying and maintaining the line as they went forward. He behaved with marked courage, energy and devotion to duty under heavy fire.
CSM P.V. Harcourt
WW1
3 June 1918
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He has consistently performed good and valuable work throughout, and has at all times set a splendid example. [2nd Canadian Divisional Signal Company.]
A/Sgt R.W. Hardy
WW1
17 April 1919
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty between 22nd October and 7th November, 1918. During this period, acting as line Serjeant, he repaired line, where they were under heavy machine-gun and artillery fire. He worked indefatigably, and by his inspiring example communication was maintained so effectively as to enable three operation orders to be transmitted to battalions during the most critical period. [4th Div. Sig. Coy., Can. Engrs., attd. H..Q., 12th Can. Inf. Bde.]
SM W.DeF. Henderson
WW1
3 June 1916
For consistent gallantry in several actions and constant devotion to duty. [3rd Divl. Sig. Coy.]
Sgt A.K. Hibbert
WW1
15 November 1918
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty while in charge of forward signal communication for the brigade. Under extremely trying conditions he successfully maintained communication by telephone with the storming battalions. The area over which he worked was continuously shelled and swept with machine-gun fire. He showed great initiative throughout and rendered valuable service.
Pte J.G. Hood
WW1
27 July 1916
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. When his signalling station was wrecked he went with another man and assisted in serving the guns of an advanced section of Artillery which had suffered casualties. Later he returned to his signalling station and destroyed his instruments and codes in face of the advancing enemy. He was wounded by shrapnel. [3rd (formerly 5th) Can. Infy. Bn. (attd. Wireless Sec., Can. Corps, H.Q. Sig. Coy.)]
Cpl L.D. Johnson
WW1
3 June 1918
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He has rendered particularly valuable service as non-commissioned officer in charge of divisional wireless stations when there was a shortage of officers, and a large part of the organisation of the wireless system was left to him. On several occasions having established stations in forward areas, he himself has made several journeys under heavy shell fire to maintain the supply of technical stores, and his energy and intelligence in training a very efficient station have been worthy of great praise.
LCpl D.B. Jones
WW1
14 January 1916
For conspicuous gallantry when repairing telephone wires under fire, and for general good work. [Sig Troop Canadian Cavalry Brigade, formerly 6th Bn Fort Garry Horse.]
Sig R.G. Jones
WW1
3 June 1916
For conspicuous gallentry and good work when in charge of a signal station. He repeatedly ran new lines and repaired breaks under heavy shell and rifle fire.
Cpl B.E. Kennedy
WW1
23 June 1915
For conspicuous gallantry in carrying messages between Brielen, Ypres, St. Jean Weiltje and St. Julien. During the whole action this road was being continuously shelled and he ran a great risk while performing this duty. [Canadian Signal Company.]
Sgt A. Kilpatrick
WW1
22 October 1917
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty while superintending cable burying. The enemy opened a bombardment on the working party, forcing them to take cover in a trench some distance away. One man, severely wounded, was left in the cable trench, and this N.C.O., regardless of the danger, went to him, bandaged his wounds, and remained with him till the shelling lessened, when he got stretcher bearers to remove him. His prompt dressing of the wounds undoubtedly saved the man's life. The shelling continued, but he, by his steadiness and magnificent example, rallied the men, and finished the work, which was of the utmost importance.
Pte A. MacArtair
WW1
23 June 1915
For conspicuous gallantry on 22nd to 25th April, 1915, when telephone lines were down, in carrying orders, under heavy shell and rifle fire, to St. Julien-Ypres Salient. [Canadian Signal Company.]
2/Cpl W.F. Marsh
WW1
3 June 1918
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He rendered excellent service during recent operations in maintaining communication on the buried cable routes, which were being. continually broken by enemy shell fire. He has always set a splendid example of devotion to duty.
SM G.C. Massey
WW1
3 June 1916
For consistent good work and devotion to duty under all circumstances. He has set a fine example to all ranks. [3rd Divl. Sig. Coy., Canadian Engrs.]
A/Cpl K.G. McDonald
WW1
1 January 1919
For maintaining telephone communications in the vicinity of Vrely, near Posieres, between 15th and 24th August, 1918, when this area was constantly heavily shelled, and the upkeep of lines was most difficult and dangerous. He showed great courage and devotion to duty. [Can. E., ;attd. 3rd Bde., Can. G.A.]
Spr L.A. McKinnon
WW1
3 June 1919
On the night of 5th November, 1918, prior to an attack on Onnaing, he was patrolling the line, under heavy fire, when his comrade was wounded and himself blown over by a shell-burst. He rendered first aid, and conveyed his comrade to a R.A.P. He then patrolled alone until dawn. [5th Div. Sig. Co.]
Spr J.W. Milne
WW1
3 June 1919
At brigade position south of Boiry on the night of 1st-2nd September, 1918, he, through his courage and determination, established communications under heavy shell fire and bombing, and maintained them to all batteries and brigade, when they were urgently needed for the operations in the early morning. [Can. Engrs., attd. 8th A. Bde. C.F.A.. Sig. S.S.]
Cpl A.W. Mitchell
WW1
14 January 1916
For conspicuous gallantry; he carried messages and repaired broken telephone wires, under heavy fire, exhibiting great courage and devotion to duty. [Lord Strathcona's Horse.]
Sgt H.J. Mortimer
WW1
3 June 1918
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. This non-commissioned officer has on several occasions gone out under heavy shell fire to repair telephones. The cheerful alacrity with which he has undertaken such tasks, under dangerous and difficult conditions, his coolness under fire, and his unremitting devotion to duty have been a very fine example to his men.
Spr E.F. Mount
WW1
15 November 1918
This man carried urgent, operation despatches to one of the assaulting divisions, the headquarters of which was continually on the move. After six hours search, over shell-torn and congested roads, and despite continuous hostile fire, the concussion from which twice lifted him from his machine, severely injuring him, he finally delivered his despatches, and brought back situation reports. His work undoubtedly assisted in the success of the operations.
2/Cpl J.F. Norton
WW1
14 January 1916
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty as a telephone linesman. He set a fine example under heavy shell and rifle fire. [No. 4 Section, 1st Canadian. Divisional Signal Company (Canadian' Engineers, Telegraph Detachment)]
A/Sgt G.J. Oliver
WW1
12 March 1919
For marked gallantry and devotion to duty during the attack east of the Canal du Nord from 27th to 30th September, 1918. He was the N.C.O. i./c. of the party of signallers. Shortly after starting forward he found that the infantry had passed over a machine-gun nest which was sweeping the western bank of the canal. Immediately he telephoned his brigade, and artillery fire was directed on the nest and all but one machine gun was put out of action. He then got in rear of the machine gun and rushed it single handed, shot four of the crew with his revolver, and took the fifth prisoner. He did splendid work. [1st Can Div. Sig. Co., Can. Engrs., attd. H.Q., 2nd Can. Infy. Bde.]
Sgt C.C. Polkinghorne
WW1
28 March 1918
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He remained for a long period in an advanced area maintaining and repairing telephone wires. His work was carried out continually under shell fire, and he showed the greatest courage and initiative in keeping the lines repaired. On one occasion, when a buried cable was broken in several places just before an attack, he worked continuously for twelve hours under intense fire until the whole line was repaired. It was due to his energy and resource that communication was maintained.
Pte H.S. Quigley
WW1
23 June 1915
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty when acting as linesman during the action of 22nd to 27th April, 1915, during which time he repaired at least 100 breaks under heavy shell fire. Private Quigley also assisted a wounded officer to a place of safety. He was himself wounded when repairing a line under fire on 2nd May. [21190 Private Quigley, H. S. 2nd Infantry Brigade, Staff, Canadian Contingent. ]
Sgt R.J. Routledge
WW2
15 June 1946
For devotion to duty and conspicuous bravery whilst on Special Service during his period of captivity as a prisoner of war in Hong Kong in the hands of the Japanese. From the middle of October 1942 contact had been established between officers of the Shamshuipo Camp and British Intelligence Officers [BAAG] at Waichow. About the middle of May 1943, when the method of sending and receiving messages was through the medium of Chinese drivers of the ration lorries, it became necessary to replace the contact who had been dropped from the ration party, and consequently was no longer in a position to continue the service. Routledge was a member of this ration party who, without hesitation, volunteered to fill the vacancy. He showed considerable initiative and intelligence in performing the extremely difficult and hazardous duty of passing the messages under the eyes of the Japanese guards, when the slightest slip would have resulted in exposure leading to severe punishment, even to the loss of his life. He performed this service competently until the channel of communication was closed about the middle of June. This work was of the utmost value to the Camp, ensuring as it did the vital supply of medicine for the many sick in hospital and providing important information to the outside which was urgently required. On the 1st July he was sent for by the Japanese Military Authorities and, suspecting the reason, he showed great initiative and presence of mind by giving the alarm to his fellow workers en route. He was removed from the Camp and taken to the Gendarmerie Headquarters and charged with communicating with the enemy. He was brutally beaten and suffered a variety of tortures including the Japanese "Water Torture" to endeavour to compel him to disclose the names of the officers directing these operations. In spite of incredible suffering he resolutely refused to divulge any information, and showed great courage and fortitude in enduring these repeated tortures for several hours before finally being removed to Stanley Prison to await Court Martial for espionage. The court sat on 1st December and after the statements were read the Prosecutor demanded the death penalty, but the Court awarded a sentence of 15 years imprisonment. He was confined to Stanley Prison until 22nd June 1945, when he was removed to a Military Prison in Canton. He was returned to Hong Kong on 21st August and set free. The resolute courage of this NCO in spite of indescribable suffering, and his devotion to duty, provide an example in the highest tradition of the Service.
Cpl R.C. Russ
WW1
3 June 1919
For consistent gallantry and good work throughout operations during 1918, particularly in the attack on Bourlon Wood 27th September, and the advance from the Sensee Canal to the Grand Honnelle River, 17th October to 6th November. To him is due much of the credit for maintaining under heavy fire the communications which made possible the success of the operations in which the brigade took part. [4th Div. -Sig. Co.]
A/Cpl T.W. Rutherford
WW1
3 June 1919
Near Mons, on 10th November, 1918, he was on continuous duty for twenty-four hours as motor cyclist despatch rider. He located and guided the personnel and equipment of Advanced Headquarters throughout the night under shell fire, and under difficult conditions. By his courage and resource he rendered valuable service. [H.Q. Sig. Co., Can. Engrs.]
L/Cpl R.G. Sheale
WW1
1 January 1915
For conspicuous gallantry at Tour De Paissy on 18th September in continuing to transmit messages from a building which was being severely shelled, and remaining at his post notwithstanding that a shell had burst in the room in which he was working. [1st Signal Company, Royal Engineers.]
Serjeant-Major C. Shergold
WW1
17 December 1914
For exceptional coolness and resource under a heavy shellfire at Tour de Paissy, on 18th September. [Earned while with Royal Engineers.]
Sgt W.O. Simpson
WW1
1 January 1918
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty at all times. Much of the efficiency of the company communications during operations was due to his high courage, ability, and energy.
Sgt E.E. Snelgar
WW1
12 March 1919
Near Cambrai, for conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. During the attack on Camibrai on the 1st October, 1918, a forward observation post was established near the outpost line. He undertook the work of communication with brigade headquarters, and the success obtained was due only to his untiring energy and disregard for personal safety. During the morning, under very heavy shell fire, he repaired upwards of thirty breaks in the line, and brigade headquarters were never out of touch with brigade outposts. [3rd Div. Sig. Co:, Can. Engrs., attd., 8th Can. Infy. Bde.]
Spr F.T. Spencer
WW1
14 January 1916
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty when laying and repairing" telephone lines under heavy shell and rifle fire. He has set a fine example in times of great danger. [No. 2 Section, 1st Canadian Divisional Signal Company.]
Sgt F.D. Turner
WW1
1 January 1917
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He has performed consistent good work throughout, and has at all times set a splendid example.
CQMS J.G. Waterfield
WW1
1 January 1919
He has seen service in France since February, 1915, and has continuously shown very marked devotion to duty, more especially during the period from March till September 15th, 1918, when during both, the Amiens operation and the Drocourt-Queant operations he worked unceasingly in keeping both supplies and technical stores moved up to the forward sections, himself going up under shell fire to insure the carrying out of all arrangements, thereby enabling communication being kept through during both, operations. [1st Can, Div. Sig. Coy., Can. Engrs.]
Cpl J. Winters
WW1
1 January 1919
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. On the 10th August, 1918, he carried despatches to and fro on the Roye road under heavy machine-gun and artillery fire. He worked continuously for two hours, showing great devotion to duty and an utter disregard to his personal safety. Previous to this he worked for several days in March, 1918, within a few hundred yards of the enemy, carrying despatches and scouting for the advanced troops, many times being far in advance of our own troops. His machine was finally destroyed by shell fire. [Sig. Trp., Can. E., Can. Cav. Bde.]

A bar (representing a second award of the Distinguished Conduct Medal) has been awarded to the following Signals personnel.

Name Award Era Award Date Citation
Sgt H.J. Faulkner
WW1
12 March 1919
For conspicuous gallantry and fine devotion to duty during the attack east of the Canal du Nord. From 27tn to 30th September, 1918, he was the N.C.O. in charge of all the communications forward of brigade headquarters during the attack. In the initial attack he carried his line forward just behind the attacking infantry and established a report centre exposed to very heavy fire. The information he sent back was highly important, and enabled enemy machine-gun positions to be dispersed, etc. He worked unremittingly for seventy-two hours, setting a very fine example to those under him. (D.C.M. gazetted 15th November, 1918.) [1st Div. Sig. Coy., Can. Engrs., attd. 2nd Can. Infy. Bde. H.Q.]
Cpl A.W. Mitchell
WW1
3 September 1918
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty when, as a motor cyclist, he carried messages under heavy fire right up to positions almost surrounded by the enemy. Later, the handles of his machine were shot away by a shell, and he himself badly shaken, but he obtained new handles and continued to carry messages with great gallantry.

References

  1. Data compiled from multiple sources including The London Gazette, Library and Archives Canada, History of the Royal Canadian Corps of Signals 1903-1961 and Semaphore to Satellite