Mentioned in Despatches

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Oak Leaf device
Mentioned in Despatches (MiD), now known as Mention in Dispatches in the Canadian Armed Forces, is an award for valiant conduct, devotion to duty or other distinguished service. Members who are mentioned in despatches are not awarded a separate medal for their action but wear an oak leaf device on the ribbon of the appropriate medal to mark the award. A smaller version of the oak leaf device is attached to the ribbon when worn alone. Only one device can be worn on a ribbon, irrespective of the number of times the recipient was mentioned in despatches.[1]

Before 1914 nothing was worn in uniform to signify a mention in despatches, although sometimes a gallantry medal was also awarded.

For 1914–1918 and up to 10 August 1920, the device consisted of a spray of oak leaves in bronze worn on the ribbon of the Victory Medal. Those who did not receive the Victory Medal wore the device on the British War Medal. Established in 1919, it was retroactive to August 1914. It was not a common honour with a total of 141,082 mentions recorded in the London Gazette between 1914 and 1920. There were 94 Canadian Signals related mentions in the First World War (recipients) including 11 second awards (recipients) and 2 third awards (recipients).

After the First World War, the award device was modified to be a single bronze oak leaf, worn on the ribbon of the appropriate campaign medal. For the Second World War, the oak leaf is worn on the 1939-45 War Medal. There were 402 mentions in the Second World War to members of the Royal Canadian Corps of Signals (recipients) including 8 second awards (recipients) and 1 third award (recipient).

For the Korean War, the oak leaf device was mounted on the Korea Medal. There were 18 mentions in the Korean War to members of the Royal Canadian Corps of Signals (recipients).

There was one Signals mention in the Bosnian War to Maj J.A.S. Gagnon "for valour under fire, while leading a group of hostages and carrying out other duties with the United Nations Protection Force in Sarajevo, Bosnia-Hercegovina in May 1992."

There were nine Signals mentions in the Afghanistan War.

References

  1. Wikipedia - Mentioned in dispatches