Military Cross - Signals Recipients

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The Military Cross has been awarded to the following 66 Signals personnel. In addition, 7 Signals recipients have also been awarded the first bar.[1]

Name Award Era Award Date Citation
Lt R.F. Allen
WW1
2 April 1919
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty as brigade signalling officer, during the advance from the Canal de l'Escaut during the end of October and first week in November, 1918. He organized a chain system of communications, which never failed, and by means of it brigade headquarters was in continuous touch with all battalions throughout the operations. He carried out his duties with the greatest courage and success, staying on duty day and night, even under the heaviest fire. Without his assistance it would not have been possible to force the passage of the Grand Honnelle river. [4th Divisional Signal Company attached to HQ 11th Infantry Brigade.]
Lt F. Barber
WW1
11 January 1919
For conspicuous devotion to duty and gallantry. As brigade signal officer he laid and maintained communication between brigade headquarters and battalions headquarters and report centre during the operations lasting eight days. On several occasions he, in order to relieve exhausted linesmen, personally proceeded under intense hostile fire to repair breaks. His coolness, energy and resourcefulness inspired all ranks and maintained uninterrupted communication with all advanced stations. [3rd Divisional Signal Company attached to HQ 7th Infantry Brigade.]
Lt E.L.M. Burns
WW1
10 January 1917
For conspicuous gallantry in action. In addition to organizing and running the signal lines, he personally laid and repaired armoured cables under very heavy fire. He displayed great courage and coolness throughout. (More medals - Engr? - DSO, OBE, * He was CE but worked with 3 Signal Coy in WW1)
Lt A.M. Burslem
WW2
19 June 1945
On 7 March 1945, the Algonquin Regiment with under command A Squadron 29 Canadian Armoured Reconnaissance Regiment, attacked enemy strong points at MR 103362 on the outskirts of VEEN, GERMANY. Lt Burslem, RCCS (attached to the Algonquin Regiment) directed the battalion intercommunication during this attack. During this period shelling was extremely heavy. It was impossible to prevent infiltration of enemy snipers or the resultant harassing of unit lines of communication. Drivers of supply vehicles and ambulance jeeps were continually being wounded and killed by sniper fire. In spite of this constant danger, Lt Berslem personally guided his line parties into the forward localities under heavy fire and methodical sniping and during a thirty-six hour period this officer made no less than eight trips personally repairing line and carrying batteries to the forward posts. During this action Lt Burslem also acted as guide to ammunition and supply forward localities and on one of these occasions the ammunition carrier he was leading was halted by strong anti-tank fire. Disregarding the fire his actions drew, this officer quickly transferred some badly need PIAT ammunition into his jeep and attempted to run it through to the forward company where supplies had been exhausted. He was again held up by sniper fire but successfully deadly with this situation by employing his Bren gun and eventually reached the beleaguered company. Throughout this whole action Lt Burslem carried out his hazardous work with a quiet efficiency which inspired confidence in all those who worked with him. The continuous gallant, unselfish, conduct of this officer is regarded as most worthy and in the highest interests of the service.
Capt P.L. Cadegan
WW2
6 March 1944
During the advance of the 3rd brigade toward Ortona Crossroads MR 322142 on the 12th and 13th of December the area was subjected to heavy shelling and portions of the brigade area covered by enemy snipers and machine guns. Captain P.L. Cadegan, his section reduced by casualties, personally supervised the establishment, and maintenance of line communications within the brigade area with complete disregard for his safety. His untiring work, his cheerfulness and cool efficiency under heavy shelling and small arms fire enabled efficient communications to be available at all times and was an inspiration to his section and all personnel of the brigade with whom he came in contact.
Lt L.G. Cote
Korea
4 July 1953
"During the night 2/3 May 1953, ""C"" Company, 3rd Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment, sustained a heavy attack by superior enemy forces accompanied by an intense artillery bombardment. At the time the attack was launched Lieutenant Coté was supervising the communications with a fighting patrol in the front of ""C"" Company. This patrol encountered the enemy and with the increased volume of traffic which occurred when it became apparent they had made contact with a large enemy force, it was necessary for this officer to remain on the position to supervise and assist the operators on the wireless and telephone communications, which he did in a most competent manner. As the attack developed, Lieutenant Coté assisted No.7 Platoon Commander of ""C"" Company to maintain his organization and visited section posts to report conditions of the defences. On one such tour he was twice blown from the trench into bunkers before he could return to the command post. In spite of this he carried on in a calm and confident manner, inspiring all concerned with his personal courage and coolness. At the height of the enemy assault, he left the command post to personally engage the enemy with pistol and Sten, and finally a Bren gun and grenades. He remained in the open trenches during the time that the Platoon Commander called for fire on the platoon positions and until the enemy had withdrawn, after which he once more toured the platoon locality and picked up four survivors whom he led to No.8 platoon position to the rear of No.7 platoon position. There is no doubt that his cool and courageous action in undertaking tasks for which he, as a Signals Officer need

not have necessarily performed, contributed both directly and indirectly to the successful defence of the company locality."

Lt R.C. Croly
WW1
3 June 1918
Awarded on the occasion of His Majesty's Birthday with no citation.
Lt A.C. Davis
WW2
10 November 1945
[5 Canadian Armoured Divisional Signals attached to Cape Breton Highlanders.]
Lt J.R. Donnan
WW1
14 November 1916
For conspicuous gallantry and good work. With his cable section he worked night and day on a trunk route to the front line, often under heavy shell fire. He and his men worked continuously for several days without rest, but completed their work.
Lt P.E. Earnshaw
WW1
14 November 1916
For conspicuous gallantry in action. He established and maintained communications throughout the operations under very heavy fire, displaying great courage and determination. He set a splendid example to his men.
Capt W.D. Egan
WW2
22 September 1945
Lt R.G. Elliott
WW2
12 May 1945
Lt G.P. Farr
WW1
11 January 1919
In two days' operations he showed the greatest initiative and personal courage in getting wires forward under heavy machine gun and artillery fire, and in establishing communication under circumstances involving the greatest personal danger. He kept his brigadier in touch with the forward battalions during the whole advance, and displayed efficiency, determination and gallantry of the highest order. [Signal Officer 5th Canadian Infantry Brigade.]
Lt B. Faughnan
WW1
2 December 1918
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during an attack. As brigade signalling officer he planned and carried out the maintenance of a speaking line to each battalion engaged in the operation. He was continually working in an area swept by shell and machine-gun fire, and interruptions in the service occasioned by continuous breaks in the line were frequent, and immediately repaired. [4th Canadian Divisional Signal Company attached to a Canadian Infantry Brigade.]
Lt C.O. Fellowes
WW1
7 November 1918
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during an attack. He worked unceasingly under fire in his endeavours to establish communication, and followed with his wires close behind the leading waves. He showed great determination and coolness under most difficult circumstances.
Lt A.B. Fennell
WW1
18 October 1917
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty as brigade signalling officer. All of his linesmen except one having become casualties, he personally with the remaining linesmen went out with reels of wire under intense artillery and machine-gun fire and got communication through at a critical time. During the operations he took no rest, but remained continually on duty in the shelled area. he accomplished splendid work all the time at great personal risk and under tremendous disadvantages.
Lt W.W. Finlay
WW2
10 November 1945
Lt J.C. Franklin
WW1
15 February 1919
For marked gallantry and ability as lines officer during the operations against Bourlon Wood and north of Cambrai. On September 27th, 1918, he personally reconnoitred the forward area close behind the attacking infantry under heavy machine-gun and shell fire with a view to utilising the enemy telephone routes, with the result that satisfactory communication was greatly facilitated. Despite enemy shelling and bombing, he maintained almost uninterrupted telephone communication throughout. [Canadian Corps Signal Company]
Capt J.M. Galbraith
WW2
20 April 1944
Lt D.N. Gardiner
WW2
28 April 1945
Lt A.H. Garland
WW1
15 February 1919
For conspicuous gallantry as brigade signalling officer during the operations around Bourlon Wood and north of Cambrai in September, 1918. He never rested in his efforts to maintain communication with the most forward troops. During the operation north of Cambrai a line was laid under his supervision which enabled a report centre to be established from close to the advancing troops, and owing to his fine example in face of heavy fire this line was maintained throughout the operation. [4th Divisional Signal Company attached to HQ 11th Canadian Infantry Brigade.]
Capt J.E. Genet
WW1
14 November 1916
For conspicuous gallantry in action. He personally successfully supervised and directed the maintenance of all signal communications to the rear, with great skill and determination, working under great difficulties and continual bombardments.
Capt D.H. George
WW2
30 December 1944
Lt R.B. Gibson
WW1
1 February 1919
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty east of Arras from 26th to 28th August while in command of the signal company's cable detachments. The country over which it was necessary to build the lines was most difficult for cable carts, and was heavily shelled. In spite of all difficulties, he pushed ahead with his work, and, by his coolness, energy and fine example', accomplished what often appeared impossible feats. [3rd Divisional Signal Company ]
Lt H.A. Golwynne
WW1
1 February 1919
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during the attack on the Drocourt-Queant line on 2nd September, 1918. He was in charge of the Brigade Signal Section, and by his resource on all occasions maintained communications with the battalions, often personally repairing the lines broken by shell fire. His arrangements for visual communication were excellent: he also assisted a neighbouring brigade with its communications for the best part of a day. [4th Divisional Signal Company attached to HQ 12th Infantry Brigade.]
Lt H.B. Hall
WW2
19 August 1944
Capt A. Hartley
WW1
3 June 1918
Awarded on the occasion of His Majesty's Birthday with no citation.
Lt D.B. Holman
WW1
1 February 1919
For conspicuous gallantry from 2nd to 5th September, in the vicinity and forward of Triangle Wood. He was in charge of the line of communications in the forward area. He established the report centre at Triangle Wood. From these points he superintended the laying and maintaining of the forward lines to brigade headquarters. Throughout the operation he displayed great coolness under shell fire and bombing, and by his energy and devotion to duty set a fine example to his men. [4th Divisional Signal Company.]
Capt S.B. Iler
WW1
1 January 1918
New Year award; 1918. No citation.
Lt H.H. Johnson
WW1
18 January 1918
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. During an attack this officer, with a party of twelve men, carried forward wireless instruments and heavy equipment through the enemy's counter-barrage for the purpose of erecting a station immediately in rear of the new front line. This party, with great determination, pushed forward and established their station under extremely difficult conditions. Through this officer's untiring an courageous efforts a satisfactory means of transmitting information to the forward areas was thus established.
Lt F.H.M. Jones
WW1
18 January 1918
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. On orders being received that a wireless station was to be dismantled and moved, he was sent forward on tis most difficult and important duty. He succeeded in dismantling the station and erecting it in its new position in spite of the difficult nature of the ground an heavy fire. He showed splendid courage and resource.
Capt R.J.M. LaBrosse
WW2
9 November 1944
Lt B. Lafleur
WW2
19 June 1945
Maj A.G. Lawson
WW1
4 June 1917
Awarded on the occasion of His Majesty's Birthday with no citation.
Lt W.G. Lawson
WW1
15 February 1919
Near Vis-end-Artois, August 26th/28th, 1918, for conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. When communication with the firing line was broken he wen forward and under heavy fire superintended the completion and maintenance of communications for some hours during a critical period. He has on previous operations displayed great courage and tenacity of purpose in the performance of hazardous duties. [2nd Divisional Signal Company attached to 4th Infantry Brigade.]
Maj A. Leavitt
WW1
1 January 1917
New Year award; 1917. No citation.
Capt S.A. Lee
WW1
3 June 1919
Awarded on the occasion of His Majesty's Birthday with no citation. [Fort Garry Horsey attached Canadian Cavalry Brigade Signal Troops]
Capt J.H. Leeson
WW1
1 January 1917
New Year award; 1917. No citation.
Capt D.H. MacFarlane
WW1
1 January 1917
New Year award; 1917. No citation.
Lt A.I. MacMillan
WW2
19 June 1945
Capt M.L. Maitland
WW1
2 December 1918
For conspicuous gallantry and untiring work in keeping up communications during an attack. On several occasions he got news through to brigade headquarters from the front line, when the infantry lines were down, making trips into heavily shelled areas to supervise and maintain communications which were absolutely essential to the success of the operations. [5th Canadian Divisional Signal Company.]
Maj F.G. Malloch
WW1
1 January 1918
New Year award; 1918. No citation.
Capt W.J.A. May
WW2
10 November 1945
Lt H.T. May
WW1
26 July 1917
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He went forward with the assaulting troops and established a report centre and telephone connection. He repaired the lines under heavy fire, going without food or rest for many hours, maintaining communication throughout.
Capt M.R. McCracken
WW1
1 January 1918
New Year award; 1918. No citation.
Capt K.R. McKinnon
WW1
18 July 1917
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He gallantly led his signallers to the objective under heavy fire, and quickly established communication. Throughout the action, by his courage and tenacity, these communications were maintained, thereby rendering invaluable service.
Capt W.H. McMurray
WW1
14 November 1916
For conspicuous gallantry in action. He maintained communications with the frontline during our successful attack and the subsequent enemy bombardment. He was under heavy fire, and, when most of his lines-men had become casualties, he personally maintained the lines with total disregard of his own safety.
Capt F.S. McPherson
WW1
4 June 1917
Awarded on the occasion of His Majesty's Birthday with no citation.
Lt F.S. Merry
WW1
7 November 1918
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He has always shown the utmost energy and resource in performing his duties as signal officer. He personally carried out a valuable reconnaissance under heavy fire to obtain information as to the situation, when, owing to circumstances, visual and telegraphic communication was impossible. He set a very fine example to his men.
Lt G.H. Mills
WW1
2 December 1918
For conspicuous gallantry and perseverance in laying and maintaining corps communication for three weeks, especially on one night, when he worked all night under heavy bombing to restore communication. Existing communication at the outset were almost nil, and new lines were constantly wrecked by tanks, transport traffic and hostile bombing, so he had many difficulties to overcome. [Canadian Corps Signal Company.]
Lt S.R. Parker
WW1
3 June 1918
Awarded on the occasion of His Majesty's Birthday with no citation.
Lt H.S. Quigley
WW1
19 August 1916
For conspicuous gallantry and good work in maintaining communications. On one occasion during an attack he maintained an advanced report centre in spite of intense shelling. [1st Divisional Signal Company.]
Lt F.A. Ritchie
WW1
14 November 1916
For conspicuous gallantry during operations. He established telephonic communication between two Battalion headquarters under very heavy shell-fire and in very difficult circumstances personally assisted in maintaining the line. He has done other fine work.
Lt A.F. Shaw
WW1
3 June 1919
Awarded on the occasion of His Majesty's Birthday with no citation.
T/2Lt C. Shergold
WW1
1 January 1915
Capt S.M. Smith
WW1
1 January 1919
New Year award; 1919. No citation.
Capt W.A. Steel
WW1
3 June 1918
Awarded on the occasion of His Majesty's Birthday with no citation.
Capt A.E. Stewart
WW1
1 January 1918
New Year award; 1918. No citation.
Capt A.S. Todd
WW2
10 November 1945
Lt R.E. Turnbull
WW1
8 March 1919
He showed marked devotion to duty throughout the operations in front of Amiens after 8th August, 1918, and in the Drocourt-Queant operations in September, 1918. during the Bourlon Wood operations he carried lines forward under heavy fire to establish a divisional report centre east of the Canal du Nord, near Sais en marquin Village. It was mainly due to his example and grit that these lines were successfully put through, thus enabling information to be got back early. [1st Divisional Signal Company.]
Lt H.D. Waters
WW1
4 June 1917
Awarded on the occasion of His Majesty's Birthday with no citation.
Lt E.G. Weeks
WW1
18 October 1917
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. When in charge of the buried cable system in the forward area, he displayed the greatest coolness and disregard of personal safety, making several reconnaissances through heavy fire, and sparing no effort to secure valuable information for his brigade headquarters. He set a splendid example to his men.
Lt H.N. Westwood
WW1
8 March 1919
As signal officer of the brigade he advanced, following the batteries in close support of the infantry in the storming of the Canal du Nord on 27th September, 1918. Frequently under fire, he maintained good communications throughout both that and the day following in the attacks on Abancourt. he remained continuously at work during the two days, setting a splendid example of devotion to duty to his men. [1st Canadian Divisional Signal Company attached to 2nd Brigade CFA.]
Capt F.R. Wiggs
WW2
10 November 1945
Lt H.K. Wyman
WW1
8 March 1919
For great gallantry and devotion to duty in operations near Cambrai on 9th, 10th, and 11th October, 1918, in charge of the brigade signalling section. For three days he worked indefatigably, practically without sleep, and often under heavy fire, organizing and maintaining his lines of communication. He rendered valuable service. [2nd Divisional Signal Company.]
Lt J.A.M. Young
WW1
3 June 1918
Awarded on the occasion of His Majesty's Birthday with no citation.

A bar (representing a second award of the Military Cross) has been awarded to the following Signals personnel.

Display Name Award Era Award Date Citation
Lt F. Barber
WW1
8 March 1919
For marked gallantry and devotion to duty during the operations near Cambrai, 28th September to 1st October, 1918. He was in charge of the brigade signal section, and remained constantly at duty without any sleep during the whole period. He repeatedly went forward under heavy fire, and constant touch was maintained between all units of the brigade at all times, and valuable information as to the situation was speedily transmitted to brigade headquarters. [3rd Divisional Signal Company attached to HQ 7th Infantry Brigade.]
Lt J.C. Franklin
WW1
1 January 1919
New Year award; 1919. No citation.
Capt A. Hartley
WW1
15 February 1919
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty at Inchy between September 27th, 1918, and October 2nd, 1918. As second in command and as O.C. of his company, he was in charge of the construction and maintenance of all forward divisional lines, frequently carrying out his work in the face of great danger and difficulties. Prior to the attack on September 27th, a successful reconnaissance was made by him of the forward area for the purpose of locating prospective headquarters and the non-shelled areas for lines, thus assuring the safety of communications. [4th Canadian Signal Company.]
Lt M.R. McCracken
WW1
18 January 1918
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He supervised the maintenance of communications throughout the operations in a most efficient and capable manner, personally visiting the captured area to reconnoitre positions for visual stations. His efforts met with marked success, and the energetic and indefatigable manner in which he carried out his duty for four days without rest or sleep, and many times under heavy shell fire, materially contributed to the success of the operations.
Lt K.R. McKinnon
WW1
15 February 1919
For conspicuous gallantry and outstanding good work with divisional artillery signals during the operations August 8th, 1918 to August 18th, 1918 (on the Amiens front), and again during the operations from August 28th to September 6th, 1918 (on the Cambrai front). Time and again when his lines were cut he took charge of parties himself and worked night and day under heavy machine-gun and Shell fire to keep up almost impossible communications. The success of the divisional artillery was largely due to his tenacious work. On several occasions his lines were the only ones working, and the division was dependent on the information sent in by him. [2nd Divisional Signal Company attached 2nd Divisional Artillery.]
Lt E.G. Weeks
WW1
8 March 1919
During the Bourlon Wood operations his example of cheery devotion to duty and utter disregard for personal safety has been most marked. His work through the Amiens operation. 8th-11th August, 1918, and through the Drocourt-Queant operation, 28th August - 4th September, has been splendid, and successful maintenance of lines in both these operations was largely due to him. [1st Canadian Divisional Signal Company.]
Lt J.A.M. Young
WW1
7 November 1918
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He superintended the laying and maintenance of wires over a considerable distance to the advanced positions, under heavy fire, and performed the duties of Brigade Signalling Officer with great ability. The courage and coolness with which he kept up communication during the battle contributed in no small degree to the success of the operation.

References

  1. Data compiled from multiple sources including The London Gazette, Library and Archives Canada, History of the Royal Canadian Corps of Signals 1903-1961 and Semaphore to Satellite